Arriving in Vancouver | Part one

Before school gets too busy, I thought I'd share a few images from the very first roll of film I shot on the West Coast. Expect more here soon!
All of these were shot with a combination of simple, reliable Fuji Superia 200 film and the new-to-me Minolta lens I picked up in Toronto last month | Processed by London Drugs (W Broadway and Vine)

Left: Green College at UBC Right: the UBC Rose Garden

Left: Green College at UBC
Right: the UBC Rose Garden

Rabindranath Tagore statue at UBC

Rabindranath Tagore statue at UBC

Behind the Museum of Anthropology

Behind the Museum of Anthropology

On the ferry from Vancouver to Victoria

On the ferry from Vancouver to Victoria

At the Butchart Gardens on Vancouver Island

At the Butchart Gardens on Vancouver Island

In Colour | Ottawa Wedding Photography

Since I posted my photos from Highball, I've been thinking through the ways that film should figure in other kinds of events work that I do. I'm sharing this little set of wedding images from earlier in the summer to expand on my growing inventory of the kinds of recording that are possible with the analogue tools available to me. 

As much as I love the motion and energy of high-grain, black-and-white pictures, turning back to colour and natural light has been eye-opening now that I'm working in medium format. Shooting in colour slows the pace of an event, a consequence of making photographs with lower-speed films and a larger, heavier camera. As I keep trying to articulate why exactly I shoot film, I don't want to lose sight of the relationships between the medium I work in, the way I move through spaces as a photographer, and the kinds of narratives my photos can form. 
A simple change in pace might shift different moments to the foreground and bring different stories into existence.

Shot on Kodak Portra 160 and 400 + Fujichrome Provia 100f | Processed and scanned by GPC Labworks

Portraits from the Canadian Tulip Festival | May 2016

A few impromptu photos of friends, shot on International Museum Day this year when we made a quick trip to the National Gallery, at the very best moment to see the apple blossoms. Also, this is my first post on here of images taken using my new/old Pentax 645n! I hope it's the first of many more.

Shot on Fuji 400h | Developed and scanned by GPC Labworks

absence

pumpkin carving, music, poetry, and slow mornings at Vic | shot on Kentmere 400, developed and scanned at Aden Camera

In the absence of colour, what's left?
I feel as though I'm seeing things I'd never seen in colour: the dust on a bookshelf, the shadows on the stage. I think I'll be making a few more black and white posts this winter while I try to focus in on the shapes, tones, and motion of campus life. It'll be helpful to approach my colour photography with an eye trained for the kinds of textures and details that monochrome images naturally draw attention to.

So even though I mostly shoot digital photos at low-light indoor events like last week's Acta Victoriana social, I'm glad I took the time to make some images on film. Often people say that one of the major drawbacks of shooting events on film is the delay between taking the photos and actually getting to see them. There's truth to this, which is why I so often choose digital when I'd rather use film, but I want to emphasize that the wait time for processing isn't an inconvenience external to the act of photographing; it's just another part of the process of creating.

Across all of my work, I want to learn the joy of the slow reveal: the fifteen-minute walk over to the film lab, the brief wait at the shop counter, the moment I finally sit down to look at my scans and the anticipation of it, holding the negatives up to the sunlight the whole way home.

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